Tag Archives: ecology

Feds list 7 Hawaii bee species as endangered, a first in US – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL


Federal authorities on Friday added seven yellow-faced bee species, Hawaii’s only native bees, for protection under the Endangered Species Act, a first for any bees in the United States.

Source: Feds list 7 Hawaii bee species as endangered, a first in US – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL (http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/33291502/feds-list-7-hawaii-bee-species-as-endangered-a-first-in-us).

Accessed on 01 October 2016, 15:30 hrs, UTC.

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released the list of endangered Hawaiian bee species after years of study by the nonprofit Xerces Society, independent researchers, and state officials.

Serena Jepson, director of the Portland, Oregon-based Xerces Society, said the bees are being threatened by “feral pigs, invasive ants, loss of natural habitat, fire, and development…in coastal areas.”


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Russ Roberts

Hawaii News Digest

Climate change blamed for collapse of Hawaiian forest birds – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL


A new study blames climate change for the rapid decline of native forest birds on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.

Source: Climate change blamed for collapse of Hawaiian forest birds – Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL (http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/33043980/climate-change-blamed-for-collapse-of-hawaiian-forest-birds).

Accessed on 08 September 2016, 04:05 hrs, UTC.

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment:

A recent study co-authored by wildlife and conservation biologist Lisa Crampton says higher temperatures brought on by climate change “increase the spread of mosquito-borne diseases such as avian malaria in habitats once cool enough to keep them under control.”

The report published in the journal “Scientific Advances” predicts multiple extinctions of native Hawaiian birds if global warming isn’t reversed.

We are seeing another mass extinction before our very eyes.


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Russ Roberts

Hawaii News Digest

 

‘Alala comeback nears | Hawaii Tribune-Herald


Twenty inches long from bill to tail, with dark feathers and distinctive loud calls, the ‘alala is unlike any other Hawaii forest bird.

Source: ‘Alala comeback nears | Hawaii Tribune-Herald (http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/local-news/alala-comeback-nears).

Accessed on 26 August 2016, 14:45 hrs, UTC.

Reporter:  Ivy Ashe.

Please click link to read the full article.

Comment:

The last remaining line of the Hawaiian Crow, the ‘Alala, is about ready to be released into the wild.  The ‘Alala has been extinct in the wild for more than a decade, but that will change once 12 captive-raised ‘Alala are released into the Pu’u Maka’ala Natural Reserve.

According to reporter Ivy Ashe, more releases of the Hawaiian Crow will be done over the next five years as part of a joint effort between the DLNR, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the San Diego Zoo. ‘Alala Project coordinator Jackie Gaudioso-Lavita says, “We are extremely excited to see and hear ‘alala in the wild.”

Gaudioso-Lavita says,”the birds will live in a large aviary at Pu’u Maka’ala for the first few months, in order to adjust to their new environment.”

The first release of captive-raised ‘alala is set for November 2016.


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Hawaii News Digest

KHNL: State works to protect Hawaii’s native plants


LIHUE, Hawaii (AP) – An effort to protect Hawaii’s native plants is proving effective, as about 35 percent more state species have been placed on a global list of threatened species since last year

Source: KHNL: State works to protect Hawaii’s native plants (m.hawaiinewsnow.com/hawaiinewsnow/db_352775/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=n7otCJMJ).

Accessed on 09 August 2016, 15:20 hrs, UTC.

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment:

Kauai’s “The Garden Island” newspaper reports that conservationists, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and several state agencies are “working to get more of Hawaii’s threatened and endangered plants on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red lIst of Threatened Species.”

According to botanist Maggie Sporck-Koehler, the International Red List “helps bring awareness to the rarity of Hawaii’s flora, which can lead to more protection for plants and increases in species recovery.”

The effort is paying off, with 35 percent of the state’s rare species being placed on the global list of protected species since last year.


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Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

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Russ Roberts

Hawaii News Digest

Save the Hawaiian rain forest: Volunteer for ‘Stewardship at the Summit’ programs | Hawaii Tribune-Herald


Help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rain forest at the summit of Kilauea volcano for the next 100 years and volunteer for “Stewardship at the Summit” programs from now through September in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Source: Save the Hawaiian rain forest: Volunteer for ‘Stewardship at the Summit’ programs | Hawaii Tribune-Herald (http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/community/save-hawaiian-rain-forest-volunteer-stewardship-summit-programs).

Accessed on 07 July 2016, 13:14 hrs, UTC.

Please click link to read the full article.

Comment:

There’s a lot you can do to save our endangered Hawaiian rain forests. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park has “Stewardship at the Summit” programs which give the community a chance to remove invasive plant species that restrict the growth of native plants in our forests.  The programs will be offered on July 9, 13, 23, 29; August 5, 13, and 19; and on September 2, 10, 14, 24, and 30.  Volunteers should meet at the Kilauea Visitor Center at 9 a.m. on these dates.  Dress appropriately and bring water and snacks with you.  Tools and gloves will be provided.


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Russ Roberts

Hawaii News Digest

PTA told to replace cesspools | Hawaii Tribune-Herald


KAILUA-KONA — The Army is paying $100,000 for keeping eight large-capacity cesspools open a decade after the EPA ordered the closure of all cesspools of that size.

Source: PTA told to replace cesspools | Hawaii Tribune-Herald (http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/local-news/pta-told-replace-cesspools).

Accessed on 23 June 2016, 19:59 hrs, UTC.

Reporter: Graham Milldrum (“West Hawaii Today”).

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment:

In a consent agreement published Tuesday, 21 June 2016, by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Army has agreed to pay a $100,000 fine for keeping eight “large-capacity” cesspools open a decade after the EPA ordered them closed.

The EPA says cesspools “provide no treatment for the waste and allows nitrates and human fecal material into ground water.”

Four of the illegal cesspools were at Wheeler Army Airfield/Schofield Barracks on Oahu, six were found at the Pohakuloa Training Area, and two more were located at the Kilauea Military Camp (KMC).

Under guidelines established by the EPA, a replacement wastewater system “has to be designed by a professional engineer and installed by a licensed contractor.”

The cesspools at PTA will be closed by 30 September 2016. Since the cesspools at KMC are in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, the National Park Service “has to do its own study on the effects of replacement.”

The U.S. Army will pay a $100,000 “administrative penalty”, with additional charge of $16,000 per day for each cesspool not closed and upgraded to a septic tank system.


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Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

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Until next time,

Russ Roberts

Hawaii News Digest

Respecting reefs: Scientist says their health is intertwined with human health | Hawaii Tribune-Herald


HONOLULU — After the most powerful El Nino on record heated the world’s oceans to never-before-seen levels, huge swaths of once vibrant coral reefs that were teeming with life are now stark white ghost towns disintegrating into the sea.

Source: Respecting reefs: Scientist says their health is intertwined with human health | Hawaii Tribune-Herald (http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/local-news/respecting-coral-reefs-scientist-says-their-health-intertwined-human-health).

Accessed on 20 June 2016, 15:23 hrs, UTC.

Reporter:  Caleb Jones (Associated Press).

Please click link to read the full story.

Comment:

Scientists are deeply concerned over the declining health of the world’s coral reef ecosystems. Ruth Gates, president of the International Society for Reef Studies and director of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, says scientific data are clear:  “Ultimately reef health is intertwined with human health.”

Scientists and researches at the University of Hawaii’s Institute of Marine Biology are trying to breed stronger strains of coral “to create a super coral…more resilient…to tougher conditions before transplanting them into the ocean.”

Another program sponsored by the state of Hawaii “has created seed banks and a fast growing coral nursery for expediting  coral restoration projects.”

Even NASA is feeling the urgency and has begun a worldwide high altitude survey program of vulnerable reef areas in an attempt to collect data useful for scientists.


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Opinions expressed in this blog are mine unless otherwise stated.

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Until next time,

Russ Roberts

Hawaii News Digest